Wed, Aug 27, 2014
 
News Stories

Eagleville councilmen vote to offer $58,500 for city manager; Rigsby votes no

Eagleville City Council members voted Tuesday night to offer city manager candidate Andrew S. Ellard of Hattiesburg, Miss., an annual salary of $58,500. The vote followed Mayor Sam Tune's report on his negotiations with Ellard about salary and other aspects of the position. Councilman David Rigsby, who voted against offering the sum, argued that the city had $50,000 budgeted and should stay within the amount budgeted.  Councilman Travis Brown said that the offer that the city was to make was $55,000 a year instead of the $50,000 budgeted.  

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Eagleville's mayoral race unopposed; four vie for three council seats

(Posted Thursday, Aug. 21, 2014) When the qualifying period ended today, Eagleville ended up with an uncontested mayor's race and four candidates running for three city council seats. Councilman Travis Brown will run unopposed in the Nov. 4 election for the mayor's seat being vacated by Mayor Sam Tune. The four candidates for city council positions are incumbent David Rigsby, former councilman Ronnie Hill, current Eagleville Planning Commission chairman Nick Duke and Phillip Dye, who is running for city council for the first time.

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Qualifying deadline for Nov. 4 city election set for noon Thursday

(Posted Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2014) Four candidates have already qualified to run for four city of Eagleville seats open in the Nov. 4 election with a fifth possible candidate still finishing up the qualifying process before the Thursday noon deadline. Nick Duke, chairman of the Eagleville Planning Commission, was obtaining signatures last night at the City Council meeting to run for one of three city council seats. He still had not been qualified by 4 p.m. today, according to the Rutherford County Election Commission.  

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Eagleville's residential easement sign up for sewer system successful

(Posted Wednesday, Aug. 13, 2014) The city of Eagleville has been successful in securing easements from most residents for the new sewer system. After the easements are acquired, the contractors can move forward to put the septic tanks, pumps and other equipment in place at each property. By late Tuesday, residential easements had been committed requiring 123 septic tanks/pumps of the ones provided free by the project. The city's proposal included up to 150 free septic tanks/pumps and installations, valued at up to $5,000 each, with residential areas to be targeted first and then businesses.  

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